Tearing Golf R down

So we had Golf the donor car at Pekka’s garage. We did some quick comparison to Scirocco and didn’t see anything too difficult. We’d been comparing already from ETKA and it was pretty much as we expected. The trunk floor was clearly different, otherwise the body was pretty much similar. It looked that we’re able to cut the trunk floor from Golf and swap it to Scirocco. It was time to tear the Golf down.

A view to the Golf trunk floor
A view to the Golf trunk floor
Golf floor under the rear seat. The only difference to Scirocco is the hole to tank on the driver side.
Golf floor under the rear seat. The only difference to Scirocco is the hole to tank on the driver side.
Scirocco floor under the rear seat.
Scirocco floor under the rear seat.
We weren't able to start the Golf engine to try if it works, but at least we turned the ignition on and were able to read fault codes and see that the cluster works.
We weren’t able to start the Golf engine to try if it works, but at least we turned the ignition on and were able to read fault codes and see that the cluster works.
Disassembling the Golf
Disassembling the Golf
Disassembling continues...
Disassembling continues…
DCC sensor. There's one of these on each corner of the car. Our original plan was to install Golf DCC suspension to Scirocco, but decided to skip the idea. The work with wiring harness would've been just too much.
DCC sensor. There’s one of these on each corner of the car. Our original plan was to install Golf DCC suspension to Scirocco, but decided to skip the idea. The work with wiring harness would’ve been just too much.
Engine, transmission and front axle dropped off.
Engine, transmission and front axle dropped off.
Dash out, removing the dash support bar and blower box together with wiring harness.
Dash out, removing the dash support bar and blower box together with wiring harness.
View to the engine and gear box. Practically the only difference to Scirocco is the gearbox which has the output of the drive shaft to rear axle. Because of that drive shaft the exhaust down pipe is different too.
View to the engine and gear box. Practically the only difference to Scirocco is the gearbox which has the output of the drive shaft to rear axle. Because of that drive shaft the exhaust down pipe is different too.
Another view on the engine and gearbox. We were able to sell the engine pretty soon.
Another view on the engine and gearbox. We were able to sell the engine pretty soon.
Rear axle
Rear axle
Drive shaft from front to back and Golf exhaust.
Drive shaft from front to back and Golf exhaust.
Golf fuel tank.
Golf fuel tank.
The rear axle came down pretty easily.
The rear axle came down pretty easily.
Wiring loom
Wiring loom
Just out of curiosity we decided to wight the loom. Scale reading: 16,5kg.
Just out of curiosity we decided to wight the loom. Scale reading: 16,5kg.
And this is all we needed: wires to Haldex controller (5 wires) and couple to fuel sender.
And this is all we needed: wires to Haldex controller (5 wires) and couple to fuel sender.
Pekka's garage full of Heikki's car's and parts. He wasn't too happy about it...
Pekka’s garage full of Heikki’s car’s and parts. He wasn’t too happy about it…
And this is what we needed from the body.
And this is what we needed from the body.

Finally we were able to make some space to the garage and bring Scirocco back in.

Start of the Scirocco 4motion project

As we wrote on the opening post, we went to Sweden to see a WRC rally and while we were there, we bought a crashed 2010 Golf R. Big part of the parts were already sold (including doors and interior), but it still had exactly what we needed: drivetrain and some body parts that we needed. The engine was extra, but we believed it’s easy to sell.

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Golf R at car breakers where we bought it. It had been crashed from the front and right rear corner.

It was not that easy though, the breakers was not allowed to sell the whole car… to avoid that some crazy Finns would repair a car that has been ruled for demolishing. So we had to “destroy” it first. We decided to cut the roof off – we thought we might use some other parts like pillars and sills for some other car repair.

We tried to cut the A-pillar, but that wasn’t easy due to reinforcements inside.

Finally the roof was opened and we were able to lift the car to the trailer.
Finally the roof was cut open and we were allowed to lift the car to the trailer.

Golf on our trailer
Golf on our trailer
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Nice package. Note the exhaust… 🙂

February 13th we were back to Finland and Pekka’s garage. Golf on one lift and Scirocco on another – we were finally able to compare how different the cars were.

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Scirocco and Golf on lifts – comparing what’s different. Not too much – project looking good at this point.

Scirocco 4motion project coming up

Photo: Scirocco in November 2013, still FWD.

In Finnish first:

Konvertoimme Scirocco R:n nelivetoiseksi, hankimme siihen Trafilta poikkeusluvan ja muutoskatsastimme. Suomen ensimmäinen katulaillinen neliveto-Scirocco on siis totta.  Projektikertomus tästä tulee olemaan englanniksi, koska kiinnostusta on ollut ulkomaita lähtien. Suomeksi tarinaa löytyy ffp:n keskustelupalstalta.

OK, let’s get back to English. Although this website is mainly in Finnish, we decided to write this project in English, as there’s been some international interest on this.

Car modification is very controlled in Finland. The law is strict, especially for modern cars. If you want to keep the car legal, in many cases you need to get a special permit from authorities. And it’s not easy to get, it involves a lot of paperwork and paperwork is not the ambition of car enthusiast… that’s why many give up and either keep the modifications secret or don’t even bother.  We didn’t give up and decided to give it a shot and see if we could convert a mk3 Scirocco to all wheel drive and still keep it street legal. Hopefully this works as an example for other fanatics and encourages them to build their dream cars and still be able to drive them on our every day racking and ruining roads.

The whole thing started in late 2013 when the author (Heikki) sold his Superb and bought a 2011 Scirocco R. Friends tried to warn, winter was coming and it would be no fun to drive a fwd car after Superb V6 which had AWD. And man they were right. I tool less than a month when we started to build a vision of converting the Scirocco to AWD. We knew that Scirocco is based on the same platform as mk6 Golf (PQ35). We didn’t know exactly how similar they were, but had a gut feeling that the project should be doable: Take the drivetrain from Golf and mount it on Scirocco.

Originally we were looking for just the drivetrain but eventually decided that it was safest to buy a more complete car in case we needed some parts we didn’t know we needed. And we’re glad we did. We started to look for wrecked mk6 Golf R’s, as they were the closest match to Scirocco R. Finally we found one good donor car from Sweden. At that time there was a WRC rally in Sweden, so we decided to take a long weekend trip and see the rally, buy the car and bring it to Finland with us .

During next couple of weeks we’ll try to describe what and how we did. Now, after the job is done, it’s easy to say it’s not that difficult at all. But when we started it, we didn’t really have any examples available, we had to figure out many things just by ourselves. Not to forget the paperwork that is required to get the permit.

Hope you will enjoy and leave feedback for us! If you want to know something more, leave us a question!

pajalle.com team